Websites And Domain Names For Sale

WEbsites for sale (domain names/URLs, rather). Most sites redirect currently or are non-function or offline, but easily fixed, I am not offering assistance with the site, merely selling the name to you and you will then legally own it with full control.

I legally own these domain names. Legal complaints can be directed to aus.specialtechnologyservices@gmail.com with the subject line starting with “LEGAL”.

wollongong.sex
illawarra.sex
wollongong.lol
illawarra.sex
wollongong.fun
fromwollongongfuck.me
illawarrafuck.me
45beatson.fun
honezzon45.com
illawarra.shop

Plus domain names that are quite specific and not listed here.

Alternatively, I am considering selling for much cheaper prices subdomains, of which there can be hundreds and contain their own site with as little or much complexity as you want. For example:

sally.wollongong.sex
deucebigalow.illawarra.sex
imake.wollongong.lol
im.fromwollongongfuck.me

Prices on request and details to come

Telstra (and the rest) – Mass data breach

I noticed this a couple of years ago. I informed Telstra to no avail. The Australian Cyber Security Centre referred the matter to the Department of Defence (who told me it was a corporate matter and not one of national security.)

Actually, it very much is a national security matter. Telstra have medicore default modem/router passwords (as do most other telcos), often the username is “admin” and so is the password. Even if you change it, they will use the TR-069 remote access program to perform “maintenence” on your modem, and in the process reset it to factory default settings, including the admin password.

The decade old laptop I am typing on is easily capable of scanning 1,000+ IP addresses per second targeted towards any Telstra-owned subnet. Plain language, anybody can perform a remote scan from home and get a list of home networks that can be accessed remotely. I found 10-25% of networks could be entered to varying degrees. Often a homepage of  login page was visible, many of these had either a security vulnerability or used default passwords.

Taking advantage of either method, entry could be gained to the home network and the computer, devices, phones, CCTV, and more. With a few tweaks to the settings, the DNS servers (which convert the text URL like “www.google.com” into a numerical IP address) would tamper with that Google URL and have the page sent to the end home user be a different page entirely. It might be a few ads injected into the traffic (the VPN HotSpot Shield does this – avoid it. ALso avoid NordVPN for similar reasons, and do not allow the University of Wollongong (or anywhere) install remote management software on your computer. Regarding universities, their remote exam monitoring (“proctoring”) software is actually spyware and a remote access trojan. It functions as one, only difference is you are knowingly installing it. And they can be abused.

Given UOW, the NSW Department of Justice, NSW Police Force, and more have recently had mass leaks of data compromising accounts, passwords, and financial details, as well as government personnel contact details leaked as well as classified files, you cannot trust others to keep you safe.

The DOJ and NSWPF matters were raised two years ago by myself. The contact details remain available. Confirmed accurate as I emailed the state Police commissioner, two hours later, I was contacted by the Australian Signals Directorate (part of Defense, the Australian equivalent of the United States’ NSW or the UKs’ GCHQ.)

Stories From Wollongong

Iv’e decided to take a more laid back approach to this work. I’m brilliant with computers and have been for over two decades, it frustrates me when I tell someone they have a serious issue and they stick their head in the sand and brush it off. What can you do, though? My conclusion is that you can only advise so much, then it’s best to keep your mouth shut with the unsolicited advice and allow the person to learn the hard way.

Wollongong has a varied crowd of people. Over the past decade I’ve inadvertently noticed more and more patterns – some people call this crazy; but it’s never crazy if they’re really watching you (I’ve got a great meme for that somewhere.)

Recently I had a lot of tech issues. Computer and phone acting on their own, no connecting to websites, security warnings and errors, repeatedly asked for old Apple Keychain passwords – all red flags that I completely ignored. I’m very much a “do what I say and not what I do” type of person.

I should not have let Apple’s FileVault disk encryption be unlocked (as is by default) by the user login password. You want a long password encrypting the entire hard drive, but don’t want to be typing in a massive and complex password every time you need to install a piece of software, for example. That also opens up a whole lot of other attacks including making it easy for trojans and keyloggers, operating system (on Apple computers, that’s the keychain included. With an unlocked keychain, it’s open season on the hundreds of passwords, keys, token, and security certificates located inside.

This brings me the point two, never blindly enter your admin password on any computer people a dialogue asks you to unless you understand exacctly what it’s for and you’ve requested that operation be performed.

If your computer clock is slow (or fast): you have a serious problem. Either a wailing internal battery (best case scenario), or a kernal rootkit, a very nasty piece of malware that can be used to specifically target people and control their devices. Of others will not see this and think the person is crazy. I’ve thought that myself about people until it happened to me over the past six to eighteen months, stopped trusting myself – never forget who you are.

Specifics to come at a later date. It’s been a good day and a good night and this is looking to be a great week.

New Site

Australian Special Technology Services. New website is currently under construction – sit tight.

Investigative services, cybersecurity, Identity theft recovery, complex malware and attack defense, forensics, data recovery and analysis, and more.

Based in Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

ABN/ACN 23 261 865 109 – Director: Michael Anthony Ralph – aus.specialtechnologyservices@gmail.com (PGP key coming later this week.